indianspacestation.com

Articles

'Bright Spot' on Ceres Has Dimmer Companion

'Bright Spot' on Ceres Has Dimmer Companion

 

This image was taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft of dwarf planet Ceres on Feb. 19 from a distance of nearly 29,000 miles (46,000 kilometers). It shows that the brightest spot on Ceres has a dimmer companion, which apparently lies in the same basin.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Dwarf planet Ceres continues to puzzle scientists as NASA's Dawn spacecraft gets closer to being captured into orbit around the object. The latest images from Dawn, taken nearly 29,000 miles (46,000 kilometers) from Ceres, reveal that a bright spot that stands out in previous images lies close to yet another bright area.

"Ceres' bright spot can now be seen to have a companion of lesser brightness, but apparently in the same basin. This may be pointing to a volcano-like origin of the spots, but we will have to wait for better resolution before we can make such geologic interpretations," said Chris Russell, principal investigator for the Dawn mission, based at the University of California, Los Angeles.

 

Isro’s desi cryogenic engine test successful

Isro’s desi cryogenic engine test successful

CHENNAI: Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) on Tuesday created a quiet bang that would soon propel India into a bigger league of nations launching satellites weighing up to five tonnes.

In a silent operation at the Mahendragiri test facility, Isro successfully test-fired the indigenous cryogenic engine CE-20 for 645 seconds. This marks a milestone in the country's effort to develop a big cryogenic engine to fly the ambitious GSLV-Mark III by the end of 2016.

In the absence of a proven indigenous cryogenic engine, India has been dependent on foreign space agencies like Arianne for the launch of heavy communication satellites. India's ambitious manned space programme also rests on the shoulders of GSLV-Mark III.

Chandrayaan-2 will have a completely indigenous system: ISRO chairman

Chandrayaan-2 will have a completely indigenous system: ISRO chairman

Ahemdabad: Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) chairman AS Kiran Kumar on Wednesday said the 'Chandrayaan-2', which would be developed in the next two to three years, would be completely indigenous.

"Originally, the lander (one of the parts) was supposed to come from Russia. Now we are developing our own technology. So it will be completely an indigenous system," Kumar said, adding that "sometime in 2017-18", it would be ready.

Chandrayaan-1, India's first lunar probe, was launched in 2008.

Kumar was in Ahmedabad to attend an award ceremony.

Talking about the country's Mars Orbitor Mission (MOM), he said there will be a communication black-out around June.

Related Articles